Research

Research Statement: Feminist educational researcher Patti Lather notes that qualitative study at its best is capable of refocusing educators to explore the ambiguity of experiences, showing us what we do not know rather than affirming certainties. Lather encourages researchers to engage in what Bourdieu calls “fieldwork in philosophy” by making such qualitative work part of the public dialogue on education. In my own research, I strive to do fieldwork in philosophy through interdisciplinary work that combines educational theory with qualitative methods. My goal as a researcher is to explore the liminal spaces that often fall outside the realm of data-driven dialogues and give voice to participants in the educational landscape who are often not heard.

Current Project: #teachertweets

Through reading and analyzing the tweets of over 500 teachers, this project explores the ways that teachers are forming community, speaking back to education policy makers, sharing strategies, resisting and questioning current practices and narratives of education reform. I am conducting this research in partnership with Doris Santoro of Bowdoin College. For more information, visit the #teachertweets project web site.

Current Project: School Library Voices Project

I am currently conducting interviews with New York City school librarians to explore their own perceptions of their work. Much has been written about how school librarians are invisible within the larger teaching profession; this study aims to give school librarians an opportunity to speak about their work within the context of the current climate of education reform. Through their own stories, school librarians may push back against stereotypes and old assumptions about the their role and chart a course for the future of the profession.

If you are interested in participating in the School Library Voices project, please visit the project sign-up page.

Emergent Literacies: Discourses of Reading, Writing and Research with iPad

In 2011, I began to explore questions around digital and information literacies through a qualitative study of a one-to-one iPad program in a New York City independent school’s seventh grade classrooms. Through observation, I was able to hone my research question to a look at the ways in which students’ literacy practices were impacted by the iPad; in particular their reading and study habits. Through surveys and focus group discussion, I learned that the students were experiencing a literacy shift through engagement with digital texts and the iPad. By privileging the students’ voices throughout the research process, I found that although the students enjoyed the iPad and its capabilities, they struggled to articulate how this new technology is part of a new discourse in which they are attempting to become literate. Students used the focus group as a site for dialogue about these changes, thus making the focus group a literacy event.

Read a summary of my keynote on this research at “Situating the iPad” at LREI, 5/23/12.

 

Peer Reviewed Publications

Hochman, J. (2016). “School library nostalgias.” Curriculum Inquiry. 46:2, 132-147, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03626784.2016.1144467

Hochman, J. (2015). “Reading and Reflection: Educators in Dialogue with Reflective Teacher Narratives.” Philosophy and Education Society Yearbook 2015, Urbana, IL: Philosophy and Education Society.

Hochman, J. (2014). “Connection and difference: A response to Heather Greenhalgh-Spencer.” Philosophy and Education Society Yearbook 2014, Urbana, IL: Philosophy and Education Society.

Hochman, J. (2009). “Re-thinking melancholia.Philosophy and Education Society Yearbook, Urbana, IL: Philosophy and Education Society.

Hochman, J. (2006). “Writ large: Graffiti and praxis in pedagogical thirdspaces,” Philosophy and Education Society Yearbook, Urbana, IL: Philosophy and Education Society.

Book Chapters

Hochman, J. (2016). “Collaborative pedagogies: LIS courses and public library partnerships,” In Critical Literacy Handbook. Pagowsky, N. and McElroy, K, eds. ACRL Press.

Hochman, J. (2011) “Are we going to prom or to hell?” A new heroine emerges through the domination conflict,” in Cultural Studies, Education and Youth. In Frymer, B, Carlin, M. and Broughton, J., eds. Lexington Books.

Selected Conference Presentations

Santoro, D. & Hochman, J. (2016). “This is what democracy looks like,” Presented at AERA Annual Meeting, April 2016, Washington, D.C. [Invited Presidential Session]

Hackney, S., Handel, D., Hezekiah, B., Hickman, C., Hochman, J., Lau, A., Sula, C., Ticknor, M., Zhang, R., (2016,). Visualizing the Invisible: Finding the Gaps in Discussion of Identities in LIS. Presented at ALISE Annual Meeting, January 2016, Boston, MA.

Handel, D., Hochman, J. and Santoro, D. (2015). Visualizing Teacher Tweets: Finding Professional Learning Networks in Topical Networks. Presented at ASIS&T Annual Meeting, November 2015, St. Louis, MO.

Hochman, J. (2015). Reproductive labor and the affective economy of the school library. Presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April 2015, Chicago, IL.

Hochman, J. & Santoro, D. (2015). Tweeting to transgress: Teachers using social media for practices of resistance. Presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April 2015, Chicago, IL.

Hochman, J. (2015). School library voices: early findings. Presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April 2015, Chicago, IL.

Hochman, J. (2015). Invisible subjects: Reproductive labor and the school library. Presented at The Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, March 2015, Memphis, TN.

Hochman, J. (2014). From reflective nostalgia to reflective practice: Undermining myths with memories. Presented at American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April, Philadelphia, PA.

Hochman, J. (2014) Reproductive labor and the myth of the digital native. Presented at The Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, March 2014, Albuquerque, NM.

Hochman, J. (2013). Mediating melancholia: Young women’s writing on loss. Presented at American Educational Studies Association Annual Meeting, November 2013, Baltimore, MD.

Hochman, J. (2013). Platforms in (the) common: Teaching and learning in public. Presented at Cultural Studies Association Annual Meeting, May 2013, Chicago, IL.

Hochman, J. (2013). Pedagogy in the park: Teaching and learning in/about common spaces. Presented at The Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, March 2013, Portland, OR.

Hochman, J. (2013). “It’s just different surfaces”: Tactical engagements with digital texts. Presented at Mid-Atlantic States Philosophy and Education Society Annual Meeting, February, 2013, New York, NY.

Hochman, J. (2012). “The Specter of Feminism”: Zining and Blogging as Inquiry. Presented at International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Champaign-Urbana, IL, May 2012.

 

 

 

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